• culturainatto

GLENN GOULD – A CO-AUTHOR INTERPRETEUR, PART III

Aggiornato il: apr 26

By Amir Xhakoviq

On the cover: Glenn Gould photographed by Don Huntstein


PART II:

https://www.culturainatto.com/post/glenn-gould-a-co-author-interpreteur-part-ii

*ENGLISH/ITALIANO

Traduzione di F. Dawn


From this point Gould forced himself to abandon every pianistic stereotype that was partly inherent in his interpretations earlier. Among many reasons why he decided to record another version of Bach’s Goldberg Variations later in 1981 was precisely the fact that his previous interpretation of 1955 had bits of these “niceties” which were influenced from concert career.[1] He believed that being a recording artist was more productive in terms of widening and learning new repertoire, something impossible for a concert pianist, and most importantly, Gould’s vision of recording was to distinguish it from live recording or live concert emerging as an independent medium. The same process went through in different disciplines such as theatre where film became an independent and well accepted artistic medium.

From this perspective, Gould appears as a distinctive musician who seeks to shift of the tradition of classical performance, foreseeing himself as a visionary artist and rather than accepting the limitation of a concert pianist. In many occasions when interviewed about his interpretations, he tended to imply that he is not pianist or instrumentalist, in terms of being recognised from the instrument making ironic statements such as: “I am a Canadian writer and broadcaster who happens to play the piano in his spare time”.[2] The piano was nothing more than a right instrument which could project best possibilities of delivering aesthetic values which were mostly from contrapuntal repertoire.


Filmmaker Bruno Monsaingeon with Glenn Gould - Toronto, november 1979

Focusing on recording was the most important decision he took, because it uplifted his profile as a musician becoming a conceptual interpreter. Gould has in essence “radically altered the role of the 'interpreter', who is called on to be in some sort the co-author of the score, completing it rather than giving it 'expression'.”[3] Being a composer at some extend (although later turned out unsuccessful)[4] he envisioned the process of recording similar to other artistic disciplines where the creative activity is more like a process. As a result, virtuosity was transcended to ideas that are supported by the facility of technology. Unlike concert, recording offered a variety of chances to make the piece close to perfection, or the best he could make at studio sessions. It allowed him to “take two” and reflect upon it and if the take was not satisfactory, another take would replace it and fix the previous which is in fact the same as moving picture directors apply where the editing process is the most significant for reaching the final product. Gould’s approach illustrates the process of recording as creative one which he lives with the recorded tapes for long periods that he could even take several months to reflect before the final product was established.[5]

Conservative community was highly – and unfortunately remains in our days – aggressive towards changes objecting any innovative idea that could potentially endanger the “fiscal stability of concert hall”. Among many prophesies, Gould predicted that “the influence of recording upon that future will affect not only the performer and concert impresario but composer and technical engineer, critic and historian as well”[6].

Gould’s approach of making a recording was the same as filming technique, using editing and splicing. If in the earlier years he received critiques about his “unorthodox” interpretation in live performances, the editing and splicing technique was to receive harsh critique going as far as accusing him for forgery. The response that followed in an outstanding article was a rather striking one. Namely, Gould’s belief turns out to be precisely the ‘forgery’ that will become central to the future of arts in the electronic age, as “the role of the forger, of the unknown maker of unauthenticated goods, is emblematic of electronic culture. And when the forger is done honour for his craft and no longer reviled for his acquisitiveness, the arts will have become a truly integral part of our civilization”[7]. That is in fact the reality of the accepted ‘forgery’ that Gould was emphasising, and which we are witnessing in our postmodern times.

More than three decades after his death in 1982, Gould’s innovative and complex activity primarily as a pianist remains firmly still fresh and influential today. His work has by far crossed the limits of his time emerging to an unconventional and unprecedented approach towards piano performance, questioning the entire system of instrumental tradition of piano performance and its norms built for centuries. Gould came like a comet to the conservative classical establishment at the time. His innovative approach and unwillingness to accept the institutionalised approach of performance and norms of performing along with other characteristics such as programming, have successfully challenged the stereotype of classical music establishment in general by shifting the notions of the interpreter to new entities. He wanted make a complete distinction from traditional approach to performance of a virtuoso star that place the physical approach as a primary quality. Gould’s withdraw from public concert in 1964 was an act of no precedence in the history of classical music, announcing that the live concert in the 20th century was “dead, hideous” which belonged more to the past and consequently had “no relevance to the contemporary scene” [8] of modern performance. His vision of performance was far advanced seeing himself as a recording performer he shifted to a completely new ground the notion of performance by adopting filming technique, namely splices and editing which allowed him to make structural adjustments, making him a co-author with the composer. Moreover, Gould, along with few personalities of the time classified recording as an autonomous medium. He remains still one of very few artists to have brought changes and strong critical views to the system of performance in the 20th that are relevant in the 21st century.

NOTES


[1] Glenn Gould, Interviewed by Tim Page (1981): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyUJUX72bgc [2] Monsaingeon, Bruno. “Introduction to the Last Puritan”, Bulletin van The Glenn Gould Society Groningen, The Society, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2007) Glenn Gould, Interviewed by Tim Page (1981): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyUJUX72bgc

[3] Barther, Roland. “Od djela do teksta”, Francuska nova kritika, (1971), 207.

[4] Gould was from the beginning of learning music had the ambition to become a composer. He composed several pieces. The most famous piece is the vocal quartet “So You Want to Write a Fugue?” (1958).

[5] Page, Tim. The Glenn Gould Reader. New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 1984, 338-339.


[6] Page, Tim. The Glenn Gould Reader. New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 1984, 332. [7] Page, Tim. The Glenn Gould Reader. New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 1984, 342.


[8] Glenn Gould, Concert Dropout in Conversation with John McClure: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfXFc3hku8s




GLENN GOULD - UN INTERPRETE CO-AUTORE PARTE III


Da questo punto Gould si costrinse ad abbandonare ogni stereotipo pianistico che riguardava le sue interpretazioni precedenti. Tra le molte ragioni per cui decise di registrare un'altra versione delle Variazioni Goldberg di Bach più tardi nel 1981 fu proprio il fatto che la sua precedente interpretazione, del 1955, aveva frammenti di queste "frivolezze", influenzate dalla carriera concertistica [1]. Credeva che essere un artista discografico fosse più produttivo in termini di ampliamento e apprendimento di un nuovo repertorio, cosa impossibile per un concertista, e, soprattutto, per Gould la registrazione in studio si distingueva da quella dal vivo o dal concerto dal vivo, emergendo come mezzo indipendente. Lo stesso processo è avvenuto in diverse discipline, come nel passaggio dal teatro al cinema, dove quest’ultimo è diventato un mezzo artistico indipendente e ben accetto.

Da questa prospettiva, Gould appare come un musicista che si distingue per la sua ricerca nel cambiare la tradizione della performance classica, vedendosi come un’artista visionario piuttosto che accettare i limiti di un pianista da concerto. In molte occasioni nelle interviste sulle sue interpretazioni, tendeva a sottintendere di non essere pianista o strumentista, in termini di riconoscimento dello strumento, dichiarando ironicamente: "Sono solo uno scrittore e tele-comunicatore canadese a cui capita di suonare il piano nel proprio tempo libero”.[2] Il pianoforte non era altro che lo strumento giusto, in grado di garantire le migliori possibilità nel fornire valori estetici, provenienti principalmente dal repertorio contrappuntistico.


Il regista Bruno Monsaingeon con Glenn Gould - Toronto, novembre 1979

Concentrarsi sulla registrazione è stata la decisione più importante presa, poiché ha innalzato il suo profilo di musicista, facendolo diventare interprete concettuale. Gould ha essenzialmente "modificato radicalmente il ruolo dell'" interprete ", chiamato ad essere in qualche modo il coautore della partitura, completandola piuttosto che dandogli solo" espressione ". [3] Essendo per certi aspetti anche un compositore (anche se in seguito si è rivelato senza successo)[4], ha immaginato il processo di registrazione simile a quello di altre discipline artistiche, in cui l'attività creativa è più simile a un percorso. Di conseguenza, il virtuosismo è stato superato da idee supportate dalla facilità della tecnologia. A differenza del concerto, la registrazione offriva varie possibilità per rendere il pezzo vicino alla perfezione, o il meglio che si potesse fare nelle sessioni in studio. Gli metteva a disposizione più registrazioni e la possibilità di riflettervi sopra: se la prima traccia non lo soddisfaceva, poteva registrarne una nuova che avrebbe rimpiazzato o aggiustato la precedente, modalità che viene applicata dai registi nel processo di montaggio dei film, dove esso è un punto chiave per il raggiungimento del prodotto finale. L’approccio di Gould mostra la creatività del processo di registrazione, col quale egli poteva convivere diversi mesi prima che il prodotto venisse definitivamente concluso.[5]

La comunità più conservatrice era – e resta tutt'ora, purtroppo – particolarmente aggressiva verso i cambiamenti, ostacolando qualsiasi idea innovativa che potesse potenzialmente mettere in pericolo la “stabilità della sala da concerto”. Tra le altre profezie, Gould predisse che “l’influenza della registrazione sul futuro non riguarderà solo esecutori e impresari, ma anche compositore e ingegnere del suono, critici e storici della musica”.[6]

Attraverso le pratiche di montaggio e di giuntaggio, la sua tecnica si avvicina a quella cinematografica. Criticato negli anni giovanili per la “non ortodossia” delle sue esecuzioni dal vivo, l’uso di tali pratiche doveva attirargli critiche aspre al punto da spingersi all'accusa di contraffazione. La risposta che ne seguì, formulata in un articolo straordinario, era piuttosto scioccante. Gould affermava infatti che la “contraffazione” sarebbe stata centrale nel futuro delle arti proprio dell’era elettronica, poiché “il ruolo del contraffattore, del creatore sconosciuto di beni non autentici, è emblematico della cultura elettronica. E quando il contraffattore riceverà lodi per la sua abilità, e non più insulti per la sua avidità, le arti saranno divenute parte integrante della nostra civiltà”[7]. Questa è infatti la realtà dell’accettata contraffazione enfatizzata da Gould, e a cui stiamo assistendo nel nostro periodo postmoderno.

Oltre trentanni dopo la sua morte (1982), la tecnica complessa e innovativa di Gould, soprattutto in quanto pianista, rimane ad oggi piuttosto influente ed attuale. Il suo lavoro ha superato di gran lunga I limiti del suo tempo, risultando in un approccio non convenzionale e senza precedenti con il piano, ponendo in questione l’intero sistema della tradizione dell’esecuzione pianistica e le sue norme andate formandosi per secoli. Gould giunse come una cometa nell’establishment. Insieme ad altre caratteristiche quali la programmazione, il suo approccio innovativo e il rifiuto di accettare norme e metodi istituzionalizzati di esecuzione hanno messo alla prova lo stereotipo dell’establishment musicale modificando la nozione di interprete. Operare una netta distinzione dall'immagine tradizionale del virtuoso, della star dal vivo: questa era la sua volontà. Il ritiro di Gould dai concerti pubblici nel 1964 è una scelta senza precedenti nella storia della musica classica, annunciando che il concerto dal vivo, nel ventesimo secolo, era “morto, orribile” appartenendo piuttosto al passato e avendo, di conseguenza, “nessuna rilevanza nella scena contemporanea”[8]. Considerandosi un esecutore da registrazione, la sua idea di esecuzione ne spostò la nozione stessa a una dimensione completamente nuova tramite l’adozioni di tecniche cinematografiche quali montaggio e giuntaggio, che gli permettevano di apportare aggiustamenti strutturali e farsi quasi un co-compositore. E non è tutto: Gould, insieme ad altre poche personalità, considerava infatti la registrazione come un medium autonomo, restando uno dei pochi artisti che abbiano apportato modificazioni significative e mosso forti critiche al sistema dell’esecuzione del ventesimo secolo. Modificazioni e critiche rilevanti anche per il ventunesimo secolo.




NOTE


[1] Glenn Gould, Interviewed by Tim Page (1981): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyUJUX72bgc


[2] Monsaingeon, Bruno. “Introduction to the Last Puritan”, Bulletin van The Glenn Gould Society Groningen, The Society, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2007) Glenn Gould, Interviewed by Tim Page (1981): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyUJUX72bgc


[3] Barther, Roland. “Od djela do teksta”, Francuska nova kritika, (1971), 207.


[4] Gould was from the beginning of learning music had the ambition to become a composer. He composed several pieces. The most famous piece is the vocal quartet “So You Want to Write a Fugue?” (1958).


[5] Page, Tim. The Glenn Gould Reader. New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 1984, 338-339.


[6] Page, Tim. The Glenn Gould Reader. New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 1984, 332.


[7] Page, Tim. The Glenn Gould Reader. New York, Alfred A. Knopf, 1984, 342.


[8] Glenn Gould, Concert Dropout in Conversation with John McClure: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfXFc3hku8s















CULTURA

Logo%202020_edited.jpg