• culturainatto

GLENN GOULD – A CO-AUTHOR INTERPRETEUR, PART II

Aggiornato il: apr 26

By Amir Xhakoviq

On the cover: Glenn Gould photographed by Don Huntstein


PART I:

https://www.culturainatto.com/post/glenn-gould-a-co-author-interpreteur-part-i

*ENGLISH/ITALIANO

Traduzione di F. Dawn

During this period of intensive concert touring since the release of Goldberg recording, Gould went through a gradual transformation. If in the earlier years there are exceptions that one can find him in live recordings where he makes effects that were not to his taste but more like efforts to be in line with certain compromising of interpretation for the sake of the listener to reach everyone present at the concert hall[1], few years before withdrawing from live concert, Gould became increasingly more original and eccentric. Apparently it was a great deal of sacrifice for him in these nine years of concert career presumably to establish enough publicity for himself, while working hard to find the way out from (as he called it “gladiator arena”[2]) public concert.

The historic decision to leave the stage came in 1964: he played the last concert in Chicago but made no announcement before or after the concert. Although he had long before in several occasions publicly admitted that he “did not like the business of concert”, to many seemed like a dead end as “nobody seriously believed that the discs which he was to continue to record were going to have a prolonged commercial career [...] and also because of the supposed austerity and uncompromising quality of the pianist’s options in terms of repertoire.”[3] Nevertheless, leaving the concert stage for Gould meant freedom of expression in terms of creative process he wanted to pursue; the anxiety of stage performing, touring with all complex activity it involved had an enormous negative effect on him psychologically and physically. He believed that the creative process was impossible to come up under the condition of daily pressure which concert touring has on o performer, and consequently declared the death of live performance.


Pianist Glenn Gould photographed by Don Hunstein – January 1961.

In an interview after withdrawing from stage, Gould describes the experience of live concert as “rather unpleasant years, traumatic”[4], comparing the stage setup for the performer as ‘gladiator’ in front of the public eye, which evaluates whether the ‘gladiator’ can win the public in one [only] given chance. He remains still today one of these artists “who have maintained a purity of purpose and who resisted the temptations of the ‘amoral’ world of the public concert while still participating in it. [...] Gould champions the delightfully totalitarian idea according to which there should exist in art no concept of “demand” but only a concept of “supply”.”[5]




Among other reasons, it is precisely this particular feature of stage performance that was unacceptable for Gould as a perfectionist, because for him taking only one chance under pressure was not suitable to build structural concepts he rigorously adhered. Live concert was apparently not suitable for Gould vision of performance. “If Gould was uninterested in music’s corporeal qualities, audio recording would seem to be the perfect medium through which he could exercise his mind-centred approach to performance.”[6] Although when listening to his live recordings one can say that it is already perfect, for him that was different. Approaching the music as a composer, conductor and with the brilliant technique mastered to perfection, ideas that came to his mind were outnumbered, for which he needed larger amounts of time to reflect on, a luxury that is impossible in live concert. On the other hand, one must note the bare fact that the institution of live concert it was the only way for him to achieve that particular perfectionism in his playing, and as he admitted, consequently it was designed to achieve the aura that he needed later for the studio career which enabled his recording to be massively sold to a larger audience.[7]

Seeing himself as another kind of musician, technology of recording offered much wider freedom and possibilities to accomplish his ideal prospects as a performing artist in the studio. Gould foresaw a completely new prospective of performance through the medium of recording and electronic media, shifting the notion of piano performance to another level that was unexplored nor even imagined before.



The fact that it was unexplored before, and Gould among very few artists which saw unlimited opportunities in the medium of technology and electronic media going through detailed study of the literature on electronic media. A leading figure on the subject of electronic media was Marshall McLuhan, a prominent scholar who “believed that electronic media offered the present West a way back to the authentic human condition of the pre-Gutenberg medieval West”[8].


Marshall McLuhan, 1911-1980

McLuhan’s beliefs on electronic media were entirely matching with Gould’s visionary approach to lift the traditional concepts of performance. He strongly opposed the long tradition since the post-Renaissance period stating that had negative influence on music, making it [music] a victim for the sake of specialisation. Hence, technology was for him regarded more like a release stating that “today the performer conditioned to think in terms of electronic projects automatically comes to think in terms of an immediacy of reception... represented by the microphone... [which makes possible] a subtle range of interpretations”.[9]

The commodity of studio created the possibility to construct interpretation purely to his ideal beliefs, and not having to thing whether the public will accept or object his interpretations. It created to him perfect conditions to concentrate only on artistic values. Recording technology freed him from compromises that a concert pianist is obliged to make in order to please, as he called it, the “bloodthirsty arena of public concert”[10].



NOTE

[1] Glenn Gould, Concert Dropout in Conversation with John McClure: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfXFc3hku8s

[2] The same.

[3] Monsaingeon, Bruno. “Introduction to the Last Puritan”, Bulletin van The Glenn Gould Society Groningen, The Society, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2007)

[4]Glenn Gould, Concert Dropout in Conversation with John McClure: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfXFc3hku8s

[5] Monsaingeon, Bruno. “Introduction to the Last Puritan”, Bulletin van The Glenn Gould Society Groningen, The Society, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2007)

[6] Sanden, Paul. “Hearing Glenn Gould’s Body: Corporeal Liveness in Recorded Music”, Current Musicology, Vol. 88 (2009), 16.

[7] Glenn Gould, Concert Dropout in Conversation with John McClure: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfXFc3hku8s

[8] Mackenzie, Michael. “Music in the Monopolization of Knowledge: Glenn Gould, the CBC, and the Construction of Canadian Intellectual Identity”, Chiasma: A Site For Thought, Vol. 1, No. 6 (2014), 101.

[9] The same.

[10] Monsaingeon, Bruno. “Introduction to the Last Puritan”, Bulletin van The Glenn Gould Society Groningen, The Society, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2007)


GLENN GOULD - UN INTERPRETE COAUTORE - PARTE II


Durante questo periodo di intensa attività concertistica, dalla pubblicazione della registrazione delle variazioni Goldberg, Gould andò verso una graduale trasformazione.

Se nei primi anni si possono trovare eccezioni nelle registrazioni live, dove egli usa soluzioni interpretative non di suo gusto, ma ci sono più sforzi per essere in linea con certi tipi di interpretazioni per il bene dell’ascoltatore e per poter raggiungere la comprensione di tutti i presenti in sala [1], qualche anno prima del ritiro dalle scene Gould divenne sempre più originale ed eccentrico. Evidentemente sono stati un grande sacrificio per lui quei nove anni di carriera concertistica, presumibilmente fatti per aumentare la propria fama, mentre lavorava duramente per trovare una via d’uscita dai concerti pubblici (che egli definiva “arena dei gladiatori”[2]).

La decisione storica di abbandonare le scene avvenne nel 1964: egli suonò per l’ultima volta a Chicago, ma non diede nessun annuncio né prima né dopo il concerto. Nonostante tempo prima avesse ammesso pubblicamente in diverse occasioni che “non amo il business dei concerti”, a molti sembrò la fine della sua carriera, in quanto “nessuno credeva seriamente che i dischi registrati avrebbero avuto un successo commerciale ancora a lungo […] dovuto anche alla evidente intransigenza e all'inflessibilità delle scelte del pianista in termini di repertorio[3]”.

Ciononostante, abbandonare il palcoscenico per Gould significò libertà di espressione nei confronti del processo creativo che voleva portare avanti; l’ansia della performance in scena, fare tour con tutta la complessa attività implicata, avevano un enorme effetto negativo su di lui, psicologicamente e fisicamente. Egli credeva che il processo creativo fosse impossibile da realizzare sotto la pressione giornaliera a cui è sottoposto l’esecutore durante la tournée concertistica, e per questo motivo pose fine alle performance dal vivo.


Il pianista Glenn Gould fotografato da Don Hunstein – Gennaio 1961

In un’intervista, dopo il ritiro, Gould descrive l’esperienza dei concerti dal vivo come “anni piuttosto spiacevoli, traumatici”[4], paragonando l’esecutore sul palcoscenico ad un gladiatore in balia del pubblico, il quale decide eventualmente se lasciarsi conquistare o meno in quell'unica occasione data. Egli rimane ancora oggi uno di quegli artisti “che ha mantenuto una purezza di propositi e ha resistito alla tentazione del mondo immorale dei concerti pubblici pur partecipandoci. […] Gould ha difeso in modo elegante l’idea totalizzante per cui non debba esistere in arte alcun concetto di domanda, ma solo di offerta".[5]





Tra le altre ragioni, era proprio questa caratteristica dell’esecuzione dal vivo a risultare inaccettabile per Gould in quanto perfezionista, perché avere un’unica possibilità sotto pressione non era adatto per poter sviluppare le strutture concettuali, a cui si atteneva rigorosamente. I concerti dal vivo quindi non erano adatti all'idea esecutiva di Gould.

“Se da una parte Gould era disinteressato all'aspetto più visivo della musica, le registrazioni audio sembrerebbero essere il mezzo perfetto attraverso cui egli ha potuto esercitare il suo approccio estremamente mentale all'esecuzione”[6]. Nonostante ciò, ascoltando le sue registrazioni dal vivo, uno può dire che esse siano comunque perfette, anche se per lui non era così. Con un approccio da compositore, direttore e con una brillante tecnica affinata alla perfezione, le idee che gli venivano in mente erano talmente numerose, per cui necessitava di una maggior quantità di tempo di riflessione, un lusso impossibile in un concerto dal vivo. D’altra parte, uno deve tener conto che sicuramente l’organizzazione dei concerti era il suo solo modo per poter raggiungere quel particolare perfezionismo nel suonare, e, come egli stesso ha ammesso, il tutto era finalizzato ad ottenere la giusta fama, utile in seguito alla carriera da registrazione in studio, permettendo ai suoi dischi di essere venduti su larga scala e a un vasto pubblico.[7] Percependosi come un musicista diverso, la tecnologia delle registrazioni gli offrì una maggiore libertà e possibilità di realizzare le sue prospettive come artista da studio di registrazione.

Gould riuscì ad anticipare una tecnica totalmente nuova di esecuzione, attraverso i mezzi di registrazione e i supporti elettronici, spostando l’idea di esecuzione pianistica su un altro livello, ancora inesplorato e mai immaginato prima.



Fu quindi uno dei pochi artisti a cogliere le illimitate opportunità nell'usare come tramite la tecnologia e i supporti elettronici, studiandone in modo dettagliato i vari meccanismi. Una personalità di spicco nel campo di questi mezzi era Marshall McLuhan, un importante studioso che “credeva che i mezzi elettronici offrissero al presente Occidente una via per tornare all'autentica condizione umana dell’Occidente medievale prima di Gutenberg”.[8]


Marshall McLuhan, 1911-1980

Le credenze di McLuhan sui mezzi elettronici erano totalmente in linea con l’approccio visionario di Gould nell'abolire il concetto tradizionale di esecuzione. Si oppose fermamente alla lunga tradizione del periodo post-rinascimentale, affermando che aveva un'influenza negativa sulla musica, rendendola [la musica] una vittima per il bene della specializzazione.

Quindi, la tecnologia era da lui considerata più come una liberazione, affermando che “oggi l'esecutore condizionato a pensare in termini di progetti elettronici viene automaticamente a pensare in termini di immediatezza di ricezione ... rappresentata dal microfono ... [che rende possibile] una sottile gamma di interpretazioni”.[9]

La comodità dello studio di registrazione gli diede la possibilità di costruire l'interpretazione puramente basandosi sulle proprie convinzioni ideali, non dovendo più pensare al giudizio del pubblico: creò le condizioni perfette per potersi concentrare solo sui valori artistici. La tecnologia di registrazione lo ha liberato dai compromessi a cui un pianista di concerti è sottoposto per compiacere, come egli l’ha chiamata, "l'arena assetata di sangue dei concerti pubblici”.[10]



NOTE

[1] Glenn Gould, Concert Dropout in Conversation with John McClure: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfXFc3hku8s

[2] Lo stesso.

[3] Monsaingeon, Bruno. “Introduction to the Last Puritan”, Bulletin van The Glenn Gould Society Groningen, The Society, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2007)

[4]Glenn Gould, Concert Dropout in Conversation with John McClure: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfXFc3hku8s

[5] Monsaingeon, Bruno. “Introduction to the Last Puritan”, Bulletin van The Glenn Gould Society Groningen, The Society, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2007)

[6] Sanden, Paul. “Hearing Glenn Gould’s Body: Corporeal Liveness in Recorded Music”, Current Musicology, Vol. 88 (2009), 16.

[7] Glenn Gould, Concert Dropout in Conversation with John McClure: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfXFc3hku8s

[8] Mackenzie, Michael. “Music in the Monopolization of Knowledge: Glenn Gould, the CBC, and the Construction of Canadian Intellectual Identity”, Chiasma: A Site For Thought, Vol. 1, No. 6 (2014), 101.

[9] Lo stesso.

[10] Monsaingeon, Bruno. “Introduction to the Last Puritan”, Bulletin van The Glenn Gould Society Groningen, The Society, Vol. 3, No. 2 (2007)